New member joins Story arc Death Adult Legion Imaginary Stories
Legion Time Comments Issue #
Pre-20th Century
  POST-CRISIS: At some unknown point in pre-history, the Time Trapper steals a single instant-long "slice" of the real universe, eliminates all inhabited worlds except Earth and Krypton, and later prevents the creation of all superheroes except for Superboy. (Action Comics #591, Aug. 1987), (Adventures of Superman #444, Sept. 1988)
  The collision and catastrophic destruction of two young galaxies causes the consciousnesses of all the living beings within those galaxies to combine into a single collective entity later known as the Aethyr. Traumatized by its experience, the entity or Oversoul, withdraws into an other-dimensional reality created within its own mind. Its shadowy border regions are a limbo-like realm that inhabitants of Krypton will one day dub the Phantom Zone.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. NOTES: It's unclear whether this story can be considered canonical, but it is the only account of the origins of Aethyr, whose existence and relationship to the Phantom Zone were revealed in The Phantom Zone #3 (Mar. 1982). It is unlikely to remain in post-Crisis continuity. Superman's first encounter with Aethyr, in Phantom Zone #3–4, presented the entity as malicious and predatory, but this story (by the same writer, Steve Gerber) suggests that Aethyr is motivated mostly by trauma, experiencing contact with the material universe or beings outside its collective self as frightening and painful.
(DC Comics Presents #97, Sept. 1986)
Four billion years ago On the planet Oa, Krona's forbidden experiment to witness the birth of creation causes the universe to split into the multiverse and unleashes a wave of evil into the cosmos. Krona is banished for his crime. His fellow Oans become the Guardians of the Universe. NOTES: This is the first chronological appearance of the Guardians of the Universe, whose first appearance in print was in Green Lantern #1 (July 1960). (Green Lantern #40, Oct. 1965)
  A faction of the Guardians, dissatisfied with their colleagues' tactics in the war against evil, splits off to become the Controllers. NOTES: The Controllers first appeared in Adventure Comics #357 (June 1967). Their connection to the Guardians was revealed in Crisis. (Crisis on Infinite Earths #7, Oct. 1985)
Three billion years ago The Guardians devise a corps of warrior androids dubbed Manhunters. After the Manhunters rebel, they are disarmed and exiled from Oa. Over the coming millennia, the Manhunters secretly conspire against their former masters. (Justice League of America #141, Apr. 1977), (Secret Origins #22, Jan. 1988)
  The Guardians of Oa organize a new force to battle evil throughout the universe: the Green Lantern Corps (first chronological appearance). The first Green Lantern is Rori Dag of the planet Rojira. NOTES: The Green Lantern Corps first appeared in Green Lantern vol. 2 #11 (Mar. 1962) (Green Lantern #67, Mar. 1969)
  Colonists from Krypton and Vruun clash on Earth, aided by the time-traveling Legionnaires. The Vruunians establish Atlantis. The Kryptonians are wiped out by their former pet lizards, which become Earth's dinosaurs.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. NOTE: This story is difficult to reconcile with pre- or post-Crisis history of Krypton and Atlantis. It may be entirely apocryphal.
Adventure Comics #333 (June 1965)
c. One million BCE Imsk, a planet around the star Irulan and the eventual homeworld of Shrinking Violet, is colonized by the Krill. Eleven years after the colonists' arrival, they discover that the planet itself shrinks for a period of 90 days every ten years. To enable them to survive the shrinkage, an Imskian scientist finds a way to use the energies of radioactive Imskian rock to let all Imskians change their size at will. The ability is passed on to subsequent generations, but all Imskians must be exposed to the radiation once per year or they will die. (Superboy & the Legion #234, Dec. 1977)
c. 12000 BCE Traditional date for the beginning of Kryptonian civilization. NOTES: Krypton was destroyed its year 10,000; 18 Kryptonian years was equal to 25 Earth years.
POST-CRISIS: These dates apply only to the Krypton of the Pocket Universe. The civilization of post-Crisis Krypton began more than 500,000 years ago.
(Action Comics #223, Dec. 1956)
c. 5000 BCE The native humanoids of the planet Rimbor (eventual homeworld of Ultra Boy) become extinct. (Legion vol. 4 #15, Feb. 1991)
c. 2000 BCE A time-lost Jo Nah (Ultra Boy) falls in love with a woman called Asherya, who is actually a Lord of Chaos. Nabu the Wise (Dr. Fate) sends him back to the 30th century. Legion vol. 4 #19 (June 1991)
1243 BCE Searching for Universo, Shrinking Violet visits Gizeh (Giza), Egypt. Adventure Comics #349 (Oct. 1966)
c. 1000 BCE A centaur named Biron, later called Comet the Super-Horse, is granted super-powers by the sorceress Circe, but Circe's enemy, the sorcerer Malador, transforms Biron into a horse and banishes him to a planet in the constellation Sagittarius, where he remains for almost 3,000 years.
POST-CRISIS:
Comet/Biron was reinvented as a totally different character in Supergirl vol. 4. #14 (Oct. 1997).
(Action Comics #293, Oct. 1962)
1000 BCE Forced to travel back in time aboard a stolen Legion time bubble with the 30th-century criminal Kasmir, Jimmy Olsen meets the teenage Samson and briefly finds work selling Beatle wigs to the locals before being rescued by Superman.
POST-CRISIS: Jimmy did not meet the Legion.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #79 (Sept. 1964)
c. 210 B.C. On their way to the wedding of Karate Kid and Projectra in 2984, Cosmic Boy, Dream Girl, Star Boy, Ultra Boy, and the White Witch are cast back in time to 20th century Earth, where they discover a group of Durlans masquerading as the Roman gods. Dream Girl predicts that Durla will be ravaged by a nuclear war within a year. NOTES: It is unclear if the trip to ancient Earth took place post-Crisis; there were no Durlans in the Pocket Universe. Legion vol. 2 Annual #2 (1983)
c. 209 BCE The civilization of the planet Durla is nearly wiped out by a nuclear conflict called the "Six-Minute War." The inhabitants survive only through their shape-changing powers. Their original form is unknown. NOTES: The date was established by Legion vol. 2 Annual #2 (1983). (Legion vol. 2 #301, July 1983)
c. 500 CE The Guardians shrink the warrior giants called Djinn to tiny size and imprison them in bottles of green energy. (Legion vol. 2 #267, Sept. 1980)
693 CE Colossal Boy tracks a time-traveling Universo to 7th century England, where, unable to control his growth power, he is attacked by medieval warriors who believe him to be a threatening giant. Adventure Comics #349 (Oct. 1966)
1280 CE Pursuing Universo, Brainiac 5 travels to Shang-Tu, China, where he encounters the legendary Kublai Khan. Adventure Comics #349 (Oct. 1966)
1300 CE In pursuit of Universo, Chameleon Boy appears in the Peruvian city of Cuzco, capitol of the Inca empire, where he is nearly slain by the jealous Inca god-king. Adventure Comics #349 (Oct. 1966)
c. 1600 CE The island of Marzal is colonized by escaped slaves. The island fades into another dimension to return for 30-year periods every 200 years. (Legion vol. 2 #265, July 1980)
1812 CE A time-traveling Saturn Girl visits Paris, where she encounters Napoleon and is nearly slain by a French aristocrat under the hypnotic control of Universo. Adventure Comics #349 (Oct. 1966)
The Silver Age 20th Century
  The Computer Tyrants of the planet Colu create a lifelike android called Brainiac to spy on human civilizations. A young boy named Vril Dox (the ancestor of Querl Dox, Brainiac 5) is forced to pose as Brainiac's son, Brainiac II, but runs away before Brainiac leaves Colu. NOTES: At this point in history the planet had only been referred to as "Bryak." Brainiac 5's early appearances described him as Brainiac's natural descendant. Vril's name was first given in a text feature in Adventure Comics #335 (Aug. 1965). For the post-Crisis and Glorith-reality version of Brainiac, see the Post-Crisis section.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
(Superman #167, Feb. 1964), (Adventure Comics #365, Feb. 1968)
Lar Gand is born on Daxam to Kel and Marisa Gand.
GLORITH REALITY: Lar Gand is born later in the 20th century. NOTES: The year of Lar Gand's birth in any timeline has never been established, although 2995: Letion Sourcebook gave his birthday as March 27.
*
33 Ogtal, 9998 (Kryptonian calendar) Brainiac uses his powerful shrinking ray to steal the city of Kandor, Krypton's capitol, storing the city in a large bottle aboard his starship. NOTES: The date was given in World of Krypton #2 (Aug. 1979).
POST-CRISIS: There was no Brainiac in the Pocket Universe, so the Kandor of the Pocket Universe's Krypton presumably perished with Krypton. In the mainstream post-Crisis universe, as described in World of Krypton vol. 2 #2 (Jan. 1988), Kandor was destroyed by a nuclear device detonated by the terrorist group Black Zero at the start of Krypton's last great war, 101,000 years ago.
(Action Comics #242, July 1958)
3 to 5 Hefralt, 9997 (Kryptonian calendar)

Jor-El discovers that instability within Krypton's core will soon destroy the planet, although he is unable to convince the Science Council to take his warnings seriously. Ironically, Jor-El's assistant at this time is a time-traveling Superman, although neither Jor-El nor Lara know that Kal-El is actually their own son. NOTES: Superman's presence in this time was revealed in Superman #141 (1960) and confirmed by World of Krypton vol. 1 #1-2 (1979). The latter account established the Kryptonian dates, from Jor-El's diary.
POST-CRISIS: Superman is not present, but similar events happen in the Pocket Universe.
(Superman #141, Nov. 1960), (World of Krypton vol. 1 #1-2, July–Aug. 1979)
35 Eorx, 9998 (Kryptonian calendar)
February 29 (Earth date)
Kal-El, the son of Jor-El and Lara Lor-Van, is born in Kryptonopolis, capitol of the planet Krypton. Notes: Neither Superman's homeworld nor his parents were named until the first installment of the Superman daily newspaper strip on Jan. 16, 1939, which also revealed Superman's Kryptonian name (originally spelled Kal-L, a spelling later attributed to the Earth-Two Superman). The Earth-One Superman's terrestrial birthday was established in World's Finest #235 (1976).
POST-CRISIS:
These events take place on the Krypton of the Pocket Universe. Note: In the mainstream post-Crisis universe Kal-El was conceived in vitro on Krypton, but was not technically born until he landed on Earth.
World of Krypton #2 (Aug. 1979)
3 Ullhah, 9999 (Kryptonian calendar) Jor-El discovers the Phantom Zone and persuades Krypton's Science Council to use the Zone as a prison for Kryptonian criminals. Its inmates will later include Jax-Ur, General Zod, Faora Hu-Ul, and Quex-Ul. NOTES: The Phantom Zone first appeared in Adventure Comics #283 (Apr. 1961), although its origins were not explained at that time. According to DC Comics Presents #97 (Sept. 1986), Jor-El originally discovered the Zone while attempting to reach Krypton-Two, which he speculated had already been destroyed. In any event, the date of the discovery was established by World of Krypton #2 (Aug. 1979).
POST-CRISIS: These events take place on the Krypton of the Pocket Universe.
(Adventure Comics #283, Apr. 1961), (Superboy #104, Apr. 1963)
  Jor-El stops the elderly scientist Gaz-Or from destroying Krypton with his "earthquake machine." Gaz-Or is banished to the Phantom Zone, where he will remain for more than a 1,000 years. NOTES: Gaz-Or (originally styled "Gazor") described his crime to Phantom Girl when she met him in the Zone in the 30th century, as seen in Adventure #323 (1964). That story first established that the Bgztl Buffer Region either overlaps or is contiguous with the Phantom Zone, allowing people from Bgztl to freely enter or leave the Zone. The same was true in the post-Crisis universe, although Kryptonians of the mainstream DC universe did not use the Zone as a prison. Gaz-Or was rarely mentioned in subsequent Phantom Zone stories. Who's Who #18 (Aug. 1986) mentions him and updated the styling of his name.
POST-CRISIS: It seems unlikely that Gaz-Or existed in the Pocket Universe.
(Adventure Comics #323, Aug. 1964)
54 Belyuth, 10,000 (Kryptonian calendar) Kal-El's puppy Krypto is lost in space. NOTES: The date was given in World of Krypton #3 (Sept. 1979). A new super-powered Krypto, born on an elaborate simulacrum of Krypton constructed by Brainiac 13, was introduced in Superman vol. 2 #167 and returned to the real universe with Superman and Lois Lane in Action Comics #776 (both April 2001). Krypto remained on Earth even after the artificial Krypton was permanently cut off from the real universe in Action Comics #793 (Sept. 2002). (Adventure Comics #210, May 1951)
  Two weeks after the Phantom Zone prisoners nearly escape by exerting their combined mental influence on his feverish mind, Jor-El launches the Phantom Zone projector into deep space as part of a collection of "forbidden weapons" banned by the Science Council. NOTES: The projector and forbidden weapons cache were introduced in Adventure #283 (1961). This story — retold in World of Krypton #3 (1979), which established the date — explained why they were launched into space. In original continuity, the weapons cache was created by Kru-El, Jor-El's cousin, who was banished to the Phantom Zone and thus survived the destruction of Krypton. Kru-El first appeared in Action Comics #297 (1963).
POST-CRISIS: These events take place on the Krypton of the Pocket Universe.
(Superboy #104, Apr. 1963)
34 Ogtal, 10,000 (Kryptonian calendar) Daxamite explorer Lar Gand (Mon-El) lands on Krypton and meets Jor-El and Lara. NOTES: The date was given in World of Krypton #3 (Sept. 1979). Mon-El's real name was not revealed until the reprint of this story in Superboy #129 (May 1966).
POST-CRISIS: Lar Gand is diverted to the Pocket Universe by the Time Trapper and lands on the Pocket Universe's Krypton.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
(Superboy #89, June 1961)
39 Ogtal, 10,000 (Kryptonian calendar) A small group of Legionnaires visits Krypton on the day of its destruction. NOTES: The date of Krypton's destruction was given in World of Krypton #3 (Sept. 1979).
GLORITH REALITY:
No similar events.
Legion vol. 2 #255 (Sept. 1979)
  Jor-El's lab monkey Beppo stows away aboard Kal-El's rocket.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
(Superboy #76, Oct. 1959)
  As Krypton begins its final death throes, young Kal-El rockets to Earth in a tiny starship. NOTES: Golden Age versions of Superman's origin generally indicated that he had left Krypton as an infant while in post-Crisis continuity, he had not technically been born yet at the time of his departure. On Earth-One, Kal-El was two years old when Krypton exploded.
(Action Comics #1, June 1938)
  The explosion of Krypton transforms most of the planet's mass into a radioactive element later called Kryptonite. Some of the material later makes its way to Earth. NOTES: The concept of Kryptonite originated in an unpublished 1940 comic book story, which called the element "K-metal." It was first called Kryptonite on the Adventures of Superman radio series, where it was introduced in June 1943, and then in the comics in Superman #61 (Nov./Dec. 1949).
(Adventures of Superman radio series, June 1943)
  Jor-El's brother Zor-El and his wife Alura survive the destruction of Krypton when Argo City is blasted into space by the explosion. They later have a daughter, Kara Zor-El (Supergirl).
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. The Pocket Universe Supergirl, whose origins were told in Adventures of Superman #444 (Sept. 1988), was not Kara Zor-El, so the Pocket Universe's Argo City probably perished with Krypton. Initially, Kara Zor-El did not exist in the mainstream post-Crisis universe, but she was belatedly reintroduced in Superman/Batman #8 (May 2004). That version of the character was a teenager when Krypton was destroyed, making her chronologically older than Kal-El, but she made her journey to Earth in suspended animation, which halted her aging until her arrival.
(Action Comics #252, May 1959)
  Teenage troublemaker Dev-Em and his parents survive the destruction of Krypton in a lead-lined shelter.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. Dev-Em's entry in Who's Who in the Legion #1 (May 1988) described him as David Emery, a Titanian born on Earth, who psychically transformed himself into an ersatz Kryptonian. That explanation, which suggests that these events were only a delusional fantasy of Emery's, was never reflected in any actual story. Adventures of Superman #478 (May 1991) identified Dev-Em as a Daxamite. His full Glorith-timeline history was given in Who's Who #9 (May 1991).
(Adventure Comics #287, Sept. 1961)
  Kal-El lands in Smallville, where he immediately gains super powers under Earth's yellow sun. He is adopted by Jonathan and Martha Kent and given the name Clark Kent. Notes: Superman's adoptive parents first appeared in Superman #1 (Summer 1939). Earlier published versions of his origin said only that he was found by "a passing motorist" while the early episodes of the Adventures of Superman radio series indicated that Kal-El arrived on Earth as an adult. In September 1942, a retelling of Superman's origin on the radio series (now airing on the Mutual Broadcasting System rather than in syndication) identified his foster parents as Eben and Sarah Kent. The names Jonathan and Martha were introduced in Adventure Comics #149 (1950) and Superboy vol. 1 #12 (1951) respectively. Clark Kent's post-Crisis origin was first told in Man of Steel #1 (June 1986).
(Superman #1, Summer 1939)
  The radioactive boulders that renew Imskians' shrinking powers are consumed by a race of space dragons. Afterwards, the people of Imsk must periodically hunt the dragons and remove some of their scales, which emit the radiation necessary for the Imskians' survival. (Superboy & the Legion #234, Dec. 1977)
  Jonathan and Martha Kent fashion their adopted son's Kryptonian blankets into an invulnerable costume.
POST-CRISIS:
Same event in Pocket Universe. Notes: In the mainstream post-Crisis universe, as first mentioned in Man of Steel #1 (June 1986), Superman's costume is partially protected by his own invulnerability, but it is not indestructible, nor is it made of fabric from Krypton.
(Superboy #78, Jan. 1960)
  At age 3, Clark becomes Superbaby. (Superboy #26, Jun./July 1953)
  Baby Kal-El encounters Beppo the Super-Monkey, Jor-El's one-time lab monkey from Krypton.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superboy #76 (Oct. 1959)
  At age 6, Clark enters public school. Superboy #75 (Sept. 1959)
  8-year-old Kal-El goes into action as Superboy.
POST-CRISIS:
Superboy is active only in the Pocket Universe. In the mainstream post-Crisis universe Superman did not begin his costumed career until adulthood.
More Fun #101 (Jan./Feb. 1945)
  The infant Iris Russell appears from the 30th century and is adopted by the West family. NOTES: Iris West and Barry Allen (Flash II) are the parents of Don and Dawn Allen, the 30th Century "Tornado Twins." Iris first appeared in Showcase Comics #4 (Oct. 1956). Don and Dawn Allen first appeared in Adventure Comics #373 (Oct. 1968). (Flash vol. 1 #350, Oct. 1985)
  Superboy has his first encounter with Kryptonite, a radioactive fragment of the planet Krypton that is lethal to super-powered Kryptonian survivors. NOTES: This was Superboy's first chronological encounter with Kryptonite, which, as noted above, had been introduced in the comics in Superman #61 (Nov./Dec 1949).
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. In the post-Crisis universe, a single piece of Kryptonite was lodged on the hull of Kal-El's ship (Man of Steel #1, June 1986), but Superman did not encounter that meteorite until he was an adult (Superman vol. 2 #1, Jan. 1987).
(Adventure Comics #251, Aug. 1958)
  Superboy meets Lana Lang.
POST-CRISIS:
Same event in Pocket Universe. In the mainstream post-Crisis universe Lana Lang and Clark Kent were childhood friends, but Clark had no career as Superboy.
Superboy #10 (Oct. 1950)
  Clark turns 10. Adventure Comics #103 (Apr. 1946)
  12-year-old Clark meets the Kryptonian robot teacher. Note: DC Super-Stars #12 (Feb. 1977) states his age for this event. Adventure Comics #240 (Sept. 1957)
  Krypto arrives on Earth and is reunited with his master.
POST-CRISIS: Same event in Pocket Universe. In the mainstream post-Crisis universe Krypto is a normal dog adopted as a puppy by Superman's friend Bibbo Bibowski. He was first seen in Adventures of Superman #501 (June 1993). A new super-powered Krypto, born on an elaborate simulacrum of Krypton constructed by Brainiac 13, was introduced in Superman vol. 2 #167 and returned to the real universe with Superman and Lois Lane in Action Comics #776 (both April 2001). Krypto remained on Earth even after the artificial Krypton was permanently cut off from the real universe in Action Comics #793 (Sept. 2002).
Adventure Comics #210 (May 1955)
  14-year-old Clark meets alien Qor Sulor. Note: The story states it had been twelve years since his arrival on Earth (age 2). Superboy #137 (Apr. 1967)
1st app. The three founding members of the Legion of Super-Heroes (Cosmic Boy, Lightning Lad, and Saturn Girl) meet Superboy. He visits their clubhouse in 30th century Smallville, where he meets their other members and joins the Legion. NOTES: Other Legion members are shown in shadow, suggesting that although this was the Legion's first appearance, they'd formed some time previously. This portion of the chronology assumes that these early stories were told in the order in which Superboy experienced them. This is different than the order in which the Legionnaires experienced them (for these and other details, read the events of the 30th Century). This story describes the Legion as existing in the 30th century, although some subsequent stories placed it in the 21st century instead. Most Legion stories placed the Legion's adventures exactly 1,000 years in the future.
GLORITH REALITY:
The Legion does not meet Superboy or visit the Pocket Universe at this time.
Adventure Comics #247 (Apr. 1958)
Superboy has his first encounter with Red Kryptonite, an isotope of Kryptonite altered by its passage through a cosmic cloud, causing it to have weird, unpredictable (though fortunately temporary) effects on Kryptonians. NOTES: In its first appearance, Red-K was described as simply being "100 times" more potent than normal Green Kryptonite. Its weird effects on Superman were first demonstrated in its second appearance in Adventure Comics #255 (Dec. 1958).
POST-CRISIS:
Red Kryptonite exists only in the Pocket Universe and affects only the Kryptonian survivors of that universe. Action Comics #591 (Aug. 1987) established that the post-Crisis Superman was immune to all of the varieties of Kryptonite of the Pocket Universe. In the post-Crisis universe a sample of Red Kryptonite was created by Mr. Mxyzptlk in Superman vol. 2 #49 (Nov. 1990), but its effectiveness was solely a product of Mxyzptlk's magical powers; it was not true Kryptonite and probably was not even radioactive. A different type of Red Kryptonite was created by Batman as a contingency plan against Superman, as seen in JLA #44-45 (2000).
Adventure Comics #252 (Sept. 1958)
Superboy battles Bizarro-Superboy, an imperfect duplicate of himself created by a flawed duplicator machine. Although the creature is destroyed, years later a similar device is used to create an adult Bizarro.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superboy #68 (Nov. 1958)
2nd app. The Legion returns to the 20th century with the intent of building a "Superboy Planet" to honor him. When they review his near future, however, it looks as though he's going to rampage, so they imprison him with kryptonite instead. They learn that his activities were secretly directed by the President. The Legionnaires demonstrate a weakness to the radioactive element Sigellian. NOTES: The Legionnaires' costumes are different in this story than in their first appearance. Lightning Boy is renamed Lightning "Lad." Their names are no longer printed on their chests.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Adventure Comics #267 (Dec. 1959)
Superboy meets boy genius Lex Luthor (1st chronological appearance). While working on an antidote for Kryptonite, Luthor creates a primitive "protoplasmic lifeform." When a fire breaks out in the lab, Superboy puts it out with his super-breath. The resulting fumes destroy Luthor's creation and cost him his hair. Luthor swears vengeance on the Boy of Steel. NOTES: Luthor's first appearance was Action #23 (Apr. 1940), but Adventure Comics #271 was the first time his origin was told and he was given a first name.
POST-CRISIS: The history of the Pocket Universe's Lex Luthor was told in flashback in Adventures of Superman #444 (Sept. 1988). In the mainstream post-Crisis universe Superman and Luthor did not meet until they were adults. Their first confrontation is described in Man of Steel #4 (Sept. 1986).All encounters between the Legion and the villainous Lex Luthor are apocryphal in post-Crisis continuity.
Adventure Comics #271 (Apr. 1960)
The time-traveling Karate Kid meets Superboy and a group of young Legionnaires, who help him battle the Lord of Time and Major Disaster. The Lord of Time blasts Karate Kid forward in time and erases the Legionnaires' memories of these events. NOTES: The Lord of Time first appeared in Justice League of America #10 (Mar. 1962), Major Disaster in Green Lantern vol. 2 #43 (Mar. 1966).
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Karate Kid #12-13 (Jan.–Apr. 1978)
Clark Kent meets Pete Ross. Superboy #86 (Jan. 1961)
4th app. Lightning Lad saves Superboy from Lex Luthor's living Kryptonite men. Later, Luthor speculates that "if a Legion of Super-Heroes will exist centuries from now...then a Legion of Super-Villains probably exists in the future, too!" He vows to one day contact them to help him destroy Superboy. NOTES: The final caption of this story says "don't miss the terrific story of the Legion of Super-Villains, coming soon!" This story is also the first appearance of Superboy's Legion statuettes. In this story he has statues only of the three founding members.
POST-CRISIS: No Lex Luthor in Clark's youth.
Superboy #86 (Jan. 1961)
5th app. Lana Lang visits the 30th century with Superboy, where she uses new Legionnaire Star Boy in an effort to make Superboy jealous.
GLORITH REALITY:
No similar events.
Adventure Comics #282 (Mar. 1961)
  Superboy retrieves a cache of lost Kryptonian weapons, including a projector that sends him to the Phantom Zone. Before his foster father returns him to Earth, Superboy meets several of the Zone's inmates, including General Zod.
POST-CRISIS:
These events take place in the Pocket Universe.
Adventure Comics #283 (Apr. 1961)
7th app. Lar Gand lands on Earth, suffering from amnesia, and meets Superboy, who dubs him Mon-El. He briefly moves into the Kent home, adopting the identity of traveling salesman "Bob Cobb." He regains his memory after suffering from lead poisoning. To save his life, Superboy is forced to send him to the Phantom Zone. Note:The Legion is not referenced in this story.
GLORITH REALITY:
See the Post-Crisis Era section below for the history of Valor.
Superboy #89 (June 1961)
Pete Ross learns that Clark Kent is secretly Superboy. He does not inform his friend of his discovery. NOTES: Clark Kent did not find out that Pete learned his secret identity until they were adults, as shown in DC Comics Presents #13 (Sept. 1979).
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. The Pete Ross of the mainstream post-Crisis universe is not aware of Superman's true identity.
Superboy #90 (July 1961)
Dev-Em goes on a rampage in Smallville disguised as Superboy. He later takes his parents (still in suspended animation) and travels to the future.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. In post-Crisis continuity these events apparently took place only as a delusional fantasy of David Emery. In the Glorith timeline Dev-Em, a Daxamite, did not appear on Earth until years later.
Adventure Comics #287–288 (Sept.–Oct. 1961)
Vril Dox (Brainiac II) invents a device to give himself a 12th-level "computer brain" and leads the people of his world to overthrow the computer tyrants. The most gifted of his descendants, all of whom inherit his 12th-level intelligence, will also be called Brainiac. NOTES: The revolution was first mentioned in Superman vol. 1 #167. Brainiac II's role was first revealed in the text piece in Adventure Comics #365.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. See the Post-Crisis Era section below for the history of the post-Crisis/Glorith-timeline Brainiac.
(Superman #167, Feb. 1964), (Adventure Comics #365, Feb. 1968)
10th app. A 30th century criminal posing as Sun Boy fools Superboy into reassembling a Cyclops robot buried in Smallville by the Legion.
GLORITH REALITY:
No similar events.
Adventure Comics #290 (Nov. 1961)
Chameleon Boy visits Superboy to write an article for the Legion newspaper.
GLORITH REALITY:
No similar events.
Superboy #93 (Dec. 1961)
11th app. When the Brain Globes of Rambat mentally enslave Superboy & the Legion and threaten to take over the Earth, Krypto, Streaky the Super-Cat, Comet the Super-Horse, and Beppo the Super-Monkey join forces as the Legion of Super-Pets to save the day. NOTES: Both Streaky and Comet are from Supergirl's era, not Superboy's. Streaky's first appearance was in Action Comics #261 (Feb. 1960). This was the first appearance of Comet the Super-Horse. His first appearance in the Supergirl strip was Action #292 (Sept. 1962). An editorial note in this story describes this as "a preview glimpse of a super-pet Supergirl will own some day in the future!"
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. The existence of the Super-Pets is unlikely in other timelines.
Adventure Comics #293 (Feb. 1962)
14th app. As his test for Legion membership, Ultra Boy and his friend Marla Latham visit the 20th century, where Ultra Boy, using the name "Gary Crane," attempts to uncover Superboy's secret identity. Later, Ultra Boy and Marla make Pete Ross an honorary Legionnaire as a reward for being Superboy's loyal friend. NOTES: This story contains the first telling of Ultra Boy's origin and the first mention of his home planet, Rimbor.
GLORITH REALITY: Ultra Boy arrives later in the 20th century and meets Valor. His Glorith-reality origin was recounted in Legion vol. 4 Annual #1 (1990).
Superboy #98 (July 1962)
Superboy encounters Gold Kryptonite, an isotope of Kryptonite with the power to strip a Kryptonian of his or her super-powers forever.
POST-CRISIS: Gold Kryptonite exists only in the Pocket Universe and affects only the Kryptonian survivors of that universe. NOTES: Action #591 (Aug. 1987) established that the post-Crisis Superman was immune to all of the varieties of Kryptonite of the Pocket Universe.
Adventure Comics #299 (Aug. 1962)
While Superboy is visiting the Legion, Pete Ross has problems with a malfunctioning Superboy robot, leading Ultra Boy to travel back in time to help him.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Superboy #100 (Oct. 1962)
Brainiac 5 helps Superboy capture Blackie Burke.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Adventure Comics #309 (June 1963)
Colossal Boy helps Superboy protect his secret identity.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Adventure Comics #315 (Dec. 1963)
Pete Ross visits the Legion in the 30th century and participates in a contest to determine the new Legion leader.
GLORITH REALITY: The Legion has not yet met Superboy or Pete Ross.
Adventure Comics #323 (Aug. 1964)
Superboy accidentally travels to a parallel Earth and meets evil counterparts of the Legion. He summons that world's Superboy to turns them over to him. NOTES: The Official Legion of Super Heroes Index #4 speculates that these evil Legionnaires are from Earth-3. This could possibly mean that the good Superboy of Earth-3 grows up to be the evil Ultraman. Superboy #117 (Dec. 1964)
Lana Lang becomes Insect Queen. Superboy #124 (Oct. 1965)
Kid Psycho asks Superboy's help in joining the Legion. He eventually becomes a reserve member.
GLORITH REALITY: No Superboy at this time. Kid Psycho probably never visits the 20th century.
Superboy #125 (Dec. 1965)
Lana Lang again visits the 30th century, where, as Insect Queen, she becomes an reserve Legionnaire.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Adventure Comics #355 (Apr. 1967)
Polar Boy and his parents help Superboy battle a race of flame creatures.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Superboy #148 (June 1968)
Duo Damsel, Mon-El, Shadow Lass, and Superboy take refuge from Mordru in Superboy's era, where the 30th century Legionnaires poses as distant relatives of various Smallville residents.
GLORITH REALITY: The Legionnaires do not visit Smallville at this time.
Adventure Comics #369 (June 1968)
The Legionnaires deliberately remove their own memories of their true identities in a futile attempt to escape Mordru. Despite their efforts, Mordru captures them, along with Pete Ross and Lana Lang, and puts them on trial. The Legionnaires ultimately escape with the help of Dream Girl and the White Witch.
GLORITH REALITY:The Legionnaires do not visit Smallville at this time.
Adventure Comics #370 (July 1968)
  Superboy battles Mordru in the 20th century and imprisons him by burying him. He tosses Mordru's magical Blood Crystals into deep space, where they are later discovered by the Legion. Chameleon Boy, afflicted by the Crystals with an irrational hatred of Superboy, travels back in time to attempt to destroy the Boy of Steel.
GLORITH REALITY: The Legion is unaware of Superboy's existence at this time and Chameleon Boy does not travel back in time.
Superboy #188 (July 1972)
The Fatal Five attempts to eliminate the Legion from history by killing Superboy in the 20th century.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Superboy #198 (Oct. 1973)
Lana Lang travels to the 30th century for an adventure as Insect Queen.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Superboy #205 (Nov./Dec. 1974)
Superboy encounters the Legion's clone duplicates of the deceased Invisible Kid and Ferro Lad.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Superboy #206 (Jan./Feb. 1975)
Superboy brings the Crystal of Catastrophe back from the 30th century, where it temporarily endows young Barbara Gordon with super-powers, transforming her into Mighty Girl. NOTES: Barbara Gordon — Batgirl — first appeared in Detective Comics #359 (Jan. 1967); this is her earliest chronological appearance.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. The origin of Batgirl in Secret Origins #20 (Nov. 1987) establishes that Barbara's adventures as Mighty Girl were only imaginary in post-Crisis continuity.
Adventure Comics #453 (Sept./Oct. 1977)
Superboy returns to his own era under a hypnotic compulsion from Saturn Girl not to return to the 30th century.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Legion vol. 2 #259 (Jan. 1980)
Superboy celebrates his 16th birthday. New Adventures of Superboy #1 (Jan. 1980)
Ultra Boy is thrown back to the 20th century and trapped in the Bgztl Buffer Region. His mind is transferred into Superboy's body. Afflicted with amnesia, he adopts a new costumed identity as Reflecto and returns to the 30th century, where he re-applies for Legion membership. NOTES: These events follow Ultra Boy's apparent death in Legion vol. 2 #275 (May 1981).
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
(Legion vol. 2 #282, Dec. 1981)
The Legion travels back to the 20th century to learn why Superboy was costumed as Reflecto. NOTES: This story continues from Legion vol. 2 #279 (Sept. 1981).
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Legion vol. 2 #280 (Oct. 1981)
The Legionnaires and Superboy battle the Molecule Master and are arrested by the U.S. Army for interfering with an atomic bomb test. Phantom Girl, Dawnstar, and Superboy escape to 20th century Bgztl.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Legion vol. 2 #281 (Nov. 1981)
Phantom Girl, Dawnstar, and Superboy find Ultra Boy in the Bgztl Buffer Region and learn how he (in Superboy's body) became Reflecto. Superboy decides to resume active membership in the Legion.
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Legion vol. 2 #282 (Dec. 1981)
Superboy and Krypto help the Legion apprehend thief Nylor Truggs, who has stolen the H-Dial and allied himself with Lex Luthor. NOTES: This story implies that Brainiac 5 and Element Lad don't recognize Luthor, despite having met him several times before. The H-Dial (of the strip "Dial 'H' for Hero") first appeared in House of Mystery #158 (Jan. 1966).
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
New Adventures of Superboy #50 (Feb. 1984)
THE POCKET UNIVERSE SAGA
  POST-CRISIS: The Legion encounters severe time storms while traveling to Superboy's time. On their way back to the 30th century they briefly appear in the real universe in the year 2050. NOTES: This is technically the first appearance of the post-Crisis (aka "Pocket Universe") Superboy, though that differentiation is not explained until Action Comics #591 (Aug. 1987). The Legionnaires' brief appearance in the 21st century is seen concurrently in Hex #10 (June 1986).
GLORITH REALITY: No similar events.
Legion vol. 3 #23 (June 1986)
  POST-CRISIS: Superboy finds Smallville threatened by waves of anti-matter. The Time Trapper offers to save Smallville for a price: Superboy must help him eliminate the Legion. NOTES: These events were shown in flashback in Legion vol. 3 #38. (Legion vol. 3 #38) (Sept. 1987)
  POST-CRISIS: A group of Legionnaires is shunted back to Superboy's time by the Time Trapper. While Brainiac 5, Blok, Invisible Kid, and Sun Boy attempt to return to the 30th century, the others are attacked by Superboy.
GLORITH REALITY: Superboy leads the Legionnaires back to his own era, where he unexpectedly turns on them.
Legion vol. 3 #37 (Aug. 1987)
  POST-CRISIS: Blok, Brainiac 5, Invisible Kid, Sun Boy, and the real Superman appear in Smallville, where Superman clashes with Superboy and Krypto. Krypto loses his powers trying to expose Superman to Gold Kryptonite, which has no effect. Superboy confesses that he is being blackmailed by the Time Trapper. NOTES: This story first revealed how the Trapper created the Pocket Universe. Action Comics #591 (Aug. 1987)
POST-CRISIS: Superboy defies the Time Trapper and sacrifices himself to save the Pocket Universe. He carries the Legionnaires back to the 30th century and dies in Mon-El's arms. The residents of the Pocket Universe are unaware of his fate.
GLORITH REALITY: This is the Legion's first encounter with the Time Trapper. They believe him to be Glorith in disguise. Notes: Saturn Girl describes the Glorith-reality version of these events in Adventures of Superman #476 (May 1991).
Legion vol. 3 #38 (Sept. 1987)
At age 18, Clark Kent graduates from Smallville High. Shortly thereafter, Jonathan and Martha Kent die of Fever Plague and he enters Metropolis University.
POST-CRISIS: The Pocket Universe's Jonathan and Martha Kent die after Superboy's disappearance from Smallville. The Jonathan and Martha Kent of the mainstream post-Crisis universe are still alive and well. NOTES: The deaths of the Kents were first mentioned in Superman vol. 1 #1. The circumstances were told in Superman vol. 1 #161.
(Superman #161, May 1963)
POST-CRISIS: In the Pocket Universe, Lex Luthor arrives in Smallville and is tricked into releasing the Kryptonian criminals General Zod, Quex-Ul, and Zaora from the Phantom Zone. They begin a destructive rampage. The Pocket Universe's Lana Lang is among those killed. NOTES: This is the first appearance of the Pocket Universe Phantom Zone criminals, who are similar to but not the same as their original counterparts. The original General Zod first appeared in Adventure Comics #283 (Apr. 1961), Quex-Ul in Superman vol. 1 #157 (Nov. 1962), and Faora Hu-Ul, on whom Zaora is modeled, in Action #471 (May 1977). (Adventures of Superman #444, Sept. 1988)
Superman's Era
In the wake of his parents' deaths, Clark Kent leaves Smallville for Metropolis, where he attends Metropolis University. Once he enters college, he no longer has regular contact with the Legion. Later in his college career, he continues his solo heroic career as Superman. NOTES: Clark Kent's original college career was first mentioned in Superman vol. 1 #129 and described in greater detail in Superman: The Secret Years #1–4 (1985) and various back-up strips under the banner "The In-Between Years." His final case as a Legionnaire was never shown.
POST-CRISIS: After some months traveling the world, the mainstream post-Crisis universe's Clark Kent attends4 Metropolis University. The Pocket Universe Superboy does not live to attend college or become Superman. All encounters between the Legion and the original adult Superman are apocryphal post-Crisis. The post-Crisis Clark Kent's world travels and college career were shown in World of Metropolis #2 (Sept. 1988) and Superman: The Odyssey (1999).
(Superman #129, May 1959)
POST-CRISIS: Clark Kent makes his first public super-powered outing in Metropolis, saving the crippled space plane Constitution. He meets Lois Lane, who dubs him "Superman." He briefly returns to Smallville, where his adoptive parents reveal his extraterrestrial origins and he is accidentally exposed for the first time to Kryptonite (although he is unaware of it). Fashioning a costume for himself, he returns to Metropolis to begin his superhero career as Superman. His presence brings about the rise of a new heroic age. Man of Steel #1 (June 1986)
Clark Kent is hired by Perry White as a reporter for the Metropolis Daily Planet. NOTES: In his first comic book appearance in Action Comics #1 (June 1938), Clark Kent was hired by editor George Taylor of the Metropolis Daily Star, a story now attributed to the Earth-2 ("Golden Age") Superman. The definitive account of Clark Kent's original hiring appeared in Superman vol. 1 #133 (Nov. 1959). The post-Crisis version was told in Man of Steel #2 (July 1986). (Superman #133, Nov. 1959), Man of Steel #2 (July 1986)
Superman meets Daily Planet cub reporter Jimmy Olsen, who becomes known as Superman's Pal. Superman provides him with a signal watch to alert Superman in the event of trouble. NOTES: Jimmy was first introduced in the April 15, 1940 episode of the Adventures of Superman radio series. An unnamed office boy of similar appearance debuted in Action #6 (Nov. 1938), sometimes considered to be Jimmy's first appearance; he was first named in Superman vol. 1 #13 (Nov. 1941). The definitive account of Superman's original meeting with Jimmy Olsen, was told in Jimmy Olsen #36 (Apr. 1959). The post-Crisis version of that story and Jimmy's first chronological appearance in post-Crisis continuity was in World of Metropolis #4 (July 1988).
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. The post-Crisis Jimmy Olsen has only met the reboot Legion, not the original, pre-Zero Hour incarnation of the group. All Silver Age meetings between the Legion and Jimmy Olsen are apocryphal in post-Crisis. Originally, although Superman encountered Jimmy Olsen as Superboy, thanks to a post-hypnotic suggestion, he did not remember their earlier meetings when they later met in Metropolis.
(Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #36, Apr. 1959), (World of Metropolis #4, (July 1988)
  Superman encounters Brainiac (and his pet Koko) and recovers the Bottle City of Kandor. NOTES: Koko is a white extraterrestrial creature resembling a small monkey except for the twin antennae on its forehead. In the reboot timeline, Koko is Brainiac 5's pet. Action Comics #242 (July 1958)
Superman's pal Jimmy Olsen becomes Elastic Lad.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. In post-Crisis continuity Jimmy Olsen was briefly given stretching powers by the Eradicator in Adventures of Superman #458 (Sept. 1989), but he never called himself Elastic Lad.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #31 (Sept. 1958)
Argo City is wiped out by Kryptonite poisoning. Zor-El and Alura send their daughter Kara to Earth, where she becomes Supergirl. Superman places her in the Midvale Orphanage under the name Linda Lee and keeps her existence a secret. NOTES: This was the first appearance of Kara Zor-El, but she was preceded by another "Super-Girl," a magical construct created by Jimmy Olsen in Superman #123 (Aug. 1958). Action Comics #252 (May 1959)
  Accidentally freed from his imprisonment in the constellation Sagittarius by Kara Zor-El's rocket ship, the super-horse Biron sets out for Earth.
POST-CRISIS: The post-Crisis Biron is a totally different character.
(Action Comics #293, Oct. 1962)
Using a duplicator ray similar to that which once created the Bizarro-Superboy, Lex Luthor creates an imperfect duplicate of Superman: Bizarro. Bizarro later leaves the Earth with the newly created Bizarro Lois Lane. NOTES: The Bizarro-Superboy first appeared in Superboy #68 (Nov. 1958).
POST-CRISIS: A flawed duplicate of Superman is created by LexCorp. The post-Crisis Bizarro was first seen in Man of Steel #5 (Oct. 1986).
Action Comics #254-255 (July-Aug. 1959)
Supergirl's cat Streaky becomes Streaky the Super-Cat through exposure to a newly created Kryptonite isotope called X-Kryptonite.
POST-CRISIS: No Streaky in the post-Crisis universe.
Action Comics #261 (Feb. 1960)
Bizarro and Bizarro-Lois create hundreds of duplicates of themselves. The Bizarros transform a distant planet into a cube that they dub Htrae, the Bizarro World.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #263 (Apr. 1960)
3rd app. The three founding Legionnaires visit Supergirl in Midvale and invite her to try out for the Legion. She is disqualified after Red Kryptonite temporarily transforms her into an adult. First appearances of Chameleon Boy, Colossal Boy, and Invisible Kid. NOTES: The Legionnaires tell Supergirl that they are the children of the Legionnaires Superboy knew. This revelation was later ignored, and was edited out of some reprints of this story.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #267 (Aug. 1960)
6th app. A year after her first encounter with the Legionnaires, Saturn Girl, Phantom Girl, and Triplicate Girl travel to the 20th century to give Supergirl a second chance to try for Legion membership. She and Brainiac 5 are admitted after she recovers Excalibur, the legendary sword of King Arthur. She meets applicants Brainiac 5, Bouncing Boy, Shrinking Violet and Sun Boy. Brainiac 5 gives her a duplicate of his force-field belt, but it breaks down shortly after her return to the 20th century.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
GLORITH REALITY: Laurel Gand debuts instead, told in Legion vol. 4 #9 (July 1990).
Action Comics #276 (May 1961)
8th app. The Adult Legion: The Legion of Super-Villains (Cosmic King, Saturn Queen, and Lightning Lord) come from the future to help Lex Luthor battle Superman. Superman is aided by the adult Legion of Super-Heroes. Ultimately, Saturn Queen turns against the other villains and vows to reform. NOTES: The Super-Villains say they are from the 21st century, rather than the 30th century. As established in Legion vol. 2 #300 (June 1983), the Adult Legion (and adult LSV) were from an alternate future timeline, one that is not canonical to the timeline of the teen Legion (though some of the events predicted in the Adult Legion stories did come true). It reads as if the Adult Legion stories involving Superman were part of original Superman continuity, even if they were not the "real" future of the Legion. Some of those Adult Legion stories were also described as "Imaginary Stories."This story reveals that Lightning Lord is Lightning Lad's older brother, a fact later reflected in canonical Legion stories, and their origin on the planet Korbal. All Adult Legion stories are apocryphal in post-Crisis continuity. Superman #147 (Aug. 1961)
  Imaginary Story: After Lex Luthor succeeds in killing Superman, the three founding Legionnaires attend his funeral. NOTES: This Imaginary Story is not technically part of original DC continuity. Superman #149 (Nov. 1961)
Superman clashes with Jan-Dex and Zo-Gar, a pair of "chameleon men" from the 30th century who are members of the Legion of Super-Outlaws. NOTES: Although not specifically identified as such, Jan-Dex and Zo-Gar are clearly Durlans.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #283 (Dec. 1961)
Superman announces Supergirl's existence to the world and reveals her secret identity to her adoptive parents, Fred and Edna Danvers. The Legion helps Supergirl on her first "public" mission.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #285 (Feb. 1962)
The Superman Revenge Squad exposes Superman to Red Kryptonite, causing him to experience a terrifying nightmare in which he is put on trial by his enemies, including the adult Legion of Super-Villains. NOTES: The Superman Revenge Squad's first chronological appearance, as the Superboy Revenge Squad, was in Superboy #94 (Jan. 1962).
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #286 (Mar. 1962)
The Legionnaires stage a good-natured prank on Superman and Supergirl to celebrate the anniversary of Supergirl's arrival on Earth.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman #152 (Apr. 1962)
12th app. Supergirl travels to the future to visit the Legion, where she battles the Positive Man and the Chameleon Men and meets Streaky's descendant, Whizzy. NOTES: The Legion is shown to be in the 21st century rather than the 30th century.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #287 (Apr. 1962)
After being accidentally trapped in the Phantom Zone, Lois Lane meets Mon-El.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #33 (May 1962)
Mon-El briefly leaves the Phantom Zone to come to the aid of Supergirl.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #288 (May 1962)
13th app. Adult Legion: Supergirl and Superman travel to 10 years in the Legion's future. Supergirl tries to fix Superman up with Saturn Woman (the adult Saturn Girl), only to find that she is already married to Lightning Man (the adult Lightning Lad). NOTES: This was the second appearance of the Adult Legion and the first hint that Garth and Imra would eventually marry. Action Comics #289 (June 1962)
Jimmy Olsen is briefly trapped in the Phantom Zone, where he meets Mon-El.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #62 (July 1962)
Phantom Girl visits Supergirl in the 20th century to give her a statue Phantom Girl has created.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #290 (July 1962)
  Adult Legion: Cosmic Man and Lightning Man pose as Hercules and Samson to help Superman fool a criminal. NOTES: This was the third appearance of the Adult Legion. Superman #155 (Aug. 1962)
  Adult Legion: Jimmy Olsen and Supergirl battle members of the adult Legion of Super-Villains, including Lightning Lord, Cosmic King, Chameleon Chief, and Sun Emperor. NOTES: Teenage versions of Chameleon Chief and Sun Emperor later appeared in Superboy #208 (Apr. 1975). Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #63 (Sept. 1962)
When Superman believes that he is dying of Virus X, the Legion travels back in time to help him complete his final tasks, while Brainiac 5 works feverishly to find a cure for the virus.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman #156 (Sept. 1962)
Supergirl meets Biron, still locked in the form of a horse. She names him Comet the Super-Horse. Note: Comet's first appearance was in Adventure Comics #293 (Feb. 1962), which was described as a preview of the character.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #292-293 (Sept.-Oct. 1962)
Mon-El is present as Superman releases Quex-Ul from the Phantom Zone. Later, Cosmic Boy and Lightning Lad appear in a parade in Superman's honor. NOTES: In this story, Quex-Ul was not actually a criminal. He was hypnotized into believing himself guilty and made to take the punishment for the real criminal, a Rondor poacher named Rog-Ar. After Superman proved his innocence, Quex-Ul lost his powers and his memories through exposure to Gold Kryptonite and took a job at the Daily Planet as "Charlie Kweeskill."
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. As established in Adventures of Superman #444 (Sept. 1988), his Pocket Universe counterpart was genuinely malevolent; it's possible that writer John Byrne inadvertently conflated Quex-Ul with Jax-Ur, another, better-known Phantom Zone prisoner.
Superman #157 (Nov. 1962)
A time barrier erected by three escaped criminals from the Phantom Zone prevents the Legion from coming to Supergirl's assistance against the villains.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #298 (Mar. 1963)
At the request of Superman, Comet the Super-Horse visits Zerox, the Sorcerer's World and meets Prince Endor, who casts a spell that enables Comet to become human as long as he is in sight of a passing comet. Comet adopts the human identity of cowboy "Bronco Bill." Supergirl is unaware that Comet is able to become human. NOTE: This story shows Zerox to be a normal planet orbiting a red sun.
POST-CRISIS: In post-Crisis continuity, as revealed in Amethyst vol. 3 #4 (Feb. 1988), Zerox was originally the Gemworld, located in another dimension, and moved to the Earth dimension at some unspecified time between the 20th and 30th centuries.
Action Comics #301 (June 1963)
The Legion helps Jimmy Olsen celebrate the anniversary of Superman's arrival on Earth.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #70 (July 1963)
  Imaginary Story: Superman accidentally splits himself into Superman-Red and Superman-Blue, who join forces to make Earth a utopia and recreate Krypton. The Legion helps Supergirl travel to New Krypton. NOTES: This Imaginary Story is not technically part of original Superman continuity. Superman #162 (July 1963)
Jimmy Olsen becomes an honorary Legionnaire.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #72 (Oct. 1963)
  Adult Legion: Saturn Woman and Proty II help Superman defeat the Superman Revenge Squad. Superman #165 (Nov. 1963)
Saturn Girl visits the 20th century to help Supergirl defeat the Phantom Zone villain Tor-An.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #307 (Dec. 1963)
When Jimmy Olsen is set to marry a woman from another dimension named Rona, Ultra Boy visits the 20th century to bring him a wedding gift from the Legion. Jimmy's marriage is called off after Rona is revealed to be a notorious murderess.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #73 (Dec. 1963)
Lois Lane writes a story involving the Legion. NOTE: Because it is fictional, the events of Lois's story are not technically part of original Superman continuity.
POST-CRISIS: All pre-Zero Hour encounters between the Legion and Lois Lane are apocryphal in post-Crisis continuity. In post-Crisis continuity Lois Lane only met the post-Zero Hour reboot Legion.
Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #47 (Feb. 1964)
The Legion and the Legion of Super-Pets appear on a television program honoring Superman.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #309 (Feb. 1964)
  Lex Luthor uses a "time-space thought-scanner" to discover the origins of Brainiac, who he learns is an android, not a living being.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events. For the post-Crisis and Glorith-reality version of Brainiac, see the Post-Crisis Era section.
Superman #167 (Feb. 1964)
The Adult Legion Superman visits the Legion in their future. The adult Legion is attacked by Douglas Nolan (twin brother of Ferro Lad), under the mental domination of the Legion of Super-Villains. Note: As revealed in Legion vol. 2 #300 (June 1983), the Adult Legion stories are not part of Legion continuity, although many of their predictions did come true. This issue shows Rokk Krinn (Cosmic Man) married to Lydda Jath (Night Girl), Jo Nah (Ultra Man) married to Tinya Wazzo (Phantom Woman) — with twins — Ayla Ranzz (Light Lass) married to Brin Londo (Lone Wolf), and Tenzil Kem as President of Bismoll. It also shows statues of several dead Legionnaires: Chemical King, Power Boy, Quantum Queen, Reflecto, and Shadow Woman. Chemical King, Reflecto, and Shadow Lass eventually joined the Legion. Quantum Queen appeared as a member of the Wanderers and Power Boy was a student at the Legion Academy. Read the chronology of the Adult Legion. Adventure Comics #354 (Mar. 1967)
  Adult Legion: The Adult Legion and Superman fight the Legion of Super-Villains, which now includes Echo and Beauty Blaze. The Legionnaires are rescued by benevolent 30th century descendants of Lex Luthor and Mr. Mxyzptlk, who join the Legion. Adventure Comics #355 (Apr. 1967)
Jimmy Olsen visits the 30th century, where he aids the Legion as Elastic Lad and tries to romance several female Legionnaires.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #76 (Apr. 1964)
  Janitor Joseph Meach gains the powers of all the Legionnaires after being struck by a bolt of lightning that glances off of Superman's Legion statuettes. He battles Superman and Batman as the Composite Superman.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
World's Finest #142 (June 1964)
Jimmy Olsen briefly goes into action against Titano the Super-Ape wearing a duplicate of Colossal Boy's costume and using a serum that enables him to temporarily mimic Colossal Boy's growth powers. NOTES: Titano first appeared in Superman vol. 1 #127 (Feb. 1959).
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #77 (June 1964)
  Phantom Girl, Shrinking Violet, and Triplicate Girl visit Lois Lane in the 20th century to research their Superman Encyclopedia.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #50 (July 1964)
Jimmy Olsen visits the 30th century to participate in a contest to determine the new Legion leader.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Adventure Comics #323 (Aug. 1964)
Jimmy Olsen is kidnapped by a 30th-century crook named Kasmir, who forces Jimmy to show him how to operate his stolen time bubble. They travel back in time to the year 1000 BCE.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #79 (Sept. 1964)
  Cosmic Boy, Invisible Kid, and Saturn Girl imbue Superman with their powers and with a dose of Jimmy Olsen's Elastic Lad serum after Superman has temporarily lost his own powers.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman #172 (Oct. 1964)
  As Linda Lee Danvers, Supergirl graduates from Midvale High School and enrolls in Stanhope College. She continues her activities with the Legion.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #318 (Nov. 1964)
  Shrinking Violet visits Supergirl at Stanhope College.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #319 (Dec. 1964)
  Several female Legionnaires visit the 20th century to appear in a parade.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #56 (May 1965)
  Jimmy Olsen visits the 30th century to participate in a ceremony honoring the Legion.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #85 (June 1965)
  Adult Legion: Lex Luthor, Brainiac, and the Adult Legion of Super-Villains try to brainwash Jimmy Olsen into killing Superman. Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #87 (Sept. 1965)
Jimmy Olsen writes an article about his recent trip to the 30th century and tries a serum intended to give him powers like Star Boy's.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #88 (Oct. 1965)
The Legion sends Jimmy Olsen duplicates of the costumes of several Legionnaires that temporarily grant him that Legionnaire's powers.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #99 (Jan. 1967)
Jimmy Olsen visits the 30th century to announce his (ultimately abortive) engagement to Lucy Lane, Lois Lane's younger sister. The Legionnaires discuss their recent battle with the Sun-Eater. Jimmy and Lucy's marriage is annulled when they realize they will be terrorized by Jimmy's vengeful old flames. NOTES: The battle with the Sun-Eater took place in Adventure Comics #353 (Mar. 1967). Lucy Lane first appeared in Jimmy Olsen #36 (Apr. 1959).
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #100 (Mar. 1967)
  Adult Legion: The adult Brainiac 5 helps Superman and Batman defeat Xan, an alien who has taken Joseph Meach's place as the second Composite Superman. NOTES: Although the adult Legionnaires are from an alternate timeline and not the "true" future of the Legion, this story is part of original Superman and Batman continuity. World's Finest #168 (Aug. 1967)
Jimmy Olsen visits the Legion and tries his hand at being a 30th-century reporter.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #106 (Oct. 1967)
  Imaginary Story: Bruce Wayne and Clark Kent are raised as brothers. Batman eventually moves to the 30th century and joins the Adult Legion. NOTES: This Imaginary Story is not technically part of original Superman continuity. World's Finest #172 (Dec. 1967)
Dying of Virus X, Superman recalls his life, including his membership in the Legion.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #365 (July 1968)
  Adult Legion: Superman, Supergirl, and the adult Brainiac 5 trick Lex Luthor into freeing Superman escape from a trap set for him by Mordru. Brainiac 5 mentions that the White Witch is a member of the Adult Legion. Superman #213 (Jan. 1969)
Superman is trapped in the year 101,970 by the Time Trapper's Iron Curtain of Time.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #385 (Feb. 1970)
Superman, now aging rapidly, is sent into the distant future by the Time Trapper, seeking revenge for his earlier battles with Superboy.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #386 (Mar. 1970)
Still trapped in the future by the Time Trapper, Superman reaches the end of the universe and finds himself back in his own time, having discovered that time is a circular loop.
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Action Comics #387 (Apr. 1970)
Darkseid, the master of Apokolips, begins his search for the Anti-Life Equation in the minds of the people of Earth. Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #134 (Dec. 1970)
Superman helps Xenofobe, the Green Lantern of Sector 2814 in the 30th century, to restore history to its proper course after the Time Trapper wipes out all future timelines except that of Earth After Disaster (Kamandi's timeline). NOTES: Xenofobe was presumably an interim Green Lantern of Sector 2814, succeeding Vidar (Universo) before Rond Vidar assumed the role. The timeline involving the Great Disaster first appeared in Kamandi: Last Boy on Earth #1 (Nov. 1972). Its first chronological appearance was in OMAC #1 (Sept. 1974).
POST-CRISIS: No similar events.
Superman #295 (Jan. 1976)

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READ MORE »To learn more about the Legion's early stories, see Adventure Comics #247: A Closer Look at the Legion's Early Years in Publication